Courses

The teaching offer in the Cognitive Neuroscience PhD at SISSA consists of theoretical and methodological courses. The former are taught by our Faculty, and cover advanced topics in the fields that are investigated in the group (tactile, visual and time perception, language and reading, social and food neuroscience, and neural computation). The latter are taught by our Faculty, external experts and, occasionally, postdocs in the group; and are designed to introduce the students to the tools that they may use during their PhD (coding, information theory, TMS, fMRI, eye tracking, EEG, and scientific writing).

The courses are primarily directed to 1st year students, who must pass all the theoretical exams and the coding, information theory and scientific writing courses in order to be admitted to the second year. Senior students are also more than welcome to attend any of the courses, and take part into the exams if they wish so. The TMS, fMRI, eye tracking and EEG courses will all start with a couple of introductory meetings, which are designed the illustrate the main features of the tool at hand, so that everyone can decide whether they’re interested in attending the remaining classes.

To explore the course list for 2016-2017, please use the menu on the right.


Stochastic Thermodynamics and Thermodynamics of Information

We are pleased to announce that Prof. Luca Peliti will give six classes on Stochastic Thermodynamics and Thermodynamics of Information each morning Friday between 11 am and 1 pm starting from 20th April 2018.

Colloquium by Karen Vogtmann

Many phenomena in mathematics and science can be modeled by drawing finite networks whose nodes are connected by edges with specified lengths. After imposing various natural constraints, the set of all such models forms a geometric space, with one point for each possible model. Although some properties of these spaces are easy to verify (such as the fact that they are connected), deeper aspects (such as whether they have “holes” of various dimensions) remain quite mysterious and are the focus of much current mathematical activity.

Eye Tracking Course

We are pleased to announce that from April 9 to 13, Prof. Bernhard Angele will hold a course about eye tracking, each morning from 10 am to 12. The course will be about how an eye tracker works, setting up an experiment for data collection, data cleaning and aggregation, and data analysis and reporting. A more detailed syllabus will be posted soon on our website. 

All the SISSA PhD students (especially those in the first year) and Trento master students are strongly encouraged to attend. 

Signal detection and Information Analyses in Neuroscience

This course provides an introduction to fundamental analyses and methods for understanding computational principles governing various aspects of information processing in the brain, including examples from single sensory neurons to ensemble of neurons, and behavioural and psychological measures.

 

Syllabus

Introduction to Statistical Models

How the Brain Tells Time

This course will offer an overview of the state of the art of the neuroscience of time, from theoretical models to empirical data. Particular emphasis will be given to the perception of time. 

Cognitive Neuroscience - Neuropsychology

The aim of the Cognitive Neuroscience - Neuropsychology course will be to show how the investigation of people with impairments of cognition may help to learn more about normal cognitive processes and their neural signatures. It will focus on behavioral, neuroimaging and neuroanatomical studies on special population in human adults.

Modelling of Human Cognition Data

In this course we go together over a set of human cognition data, trying to extract reliable inferences from it. If it sounds very general, that's exactly it—you can think of this course as a series of hands-on meetings on what is our everyday task as scientists, that is, transforming experimental data into solid science (which is somewhat correlated to have a publishable paper, or a solid chance to get your PhD ;-)).

Learning, Inference, and Prediction in the Brain

This course is an introduction to the brain as a predictive organ. The brain learns about its environment and infers the state of that environment in order to predict it, which will help ensure its own survival.

Arduino and Microcontrollers Course

This course is intended as an introduction to using arduino and microcontrollers.

Introduction to Electronics

Along this course you will be guided through a rational pathway touching different topics in the field of electronics. By following a theoretical approach with practical examples connected to the scientific laboratory environment, the course is open to everybody who aims to understand and take advantage of electronics as a tool for their research.

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