Courses

The teaching offer in the Cognitive Neuroscience PhD at SISSA consists of theoretical and methodological courses. The former are taught by our Faculty, and cover advanced topics in the fields that are investigated in the group (tactile, visual and time perception, language and reading, social and food neuroscience, and neural computation). The latter are taught by our Faculty, external experts and, occasionally, postdocs in the group; and are designed to introduce the students to the tools that they may use during their PhD (coding, information theory, TMS, fMRI, eye tracking, EEG, and scientific writing).

The courses are primarily directed to 1st year students, who must pass all the theoretical exams and the coding, information theory and scientific writing courses in order to be admitted to the second year. Senior students are also more than welcome to attend any of the courses, and take part into the exams if they wish so. The TMS, fMRI, eye tracking and EEG courses will all start with a couple of introductory meetings, which are designed the illustrate the main features of the tool at hand, so that everyone can decide whether they’re interested in attending the remaining classes.

To explore the course list for 2016-2017, please use the menu on the right.


Statistical Inference

This course will give an introduction to probabilities, standard probability distributions (normal, binomial, Poisson), Bayes theorem, inference, and information Theory.

Introduction to Systems and Computational Neuroscience: Evolution of Neural Computation

The course delineates the evolution of the vertebrate nervous systems, with a particular focus on mammals and among them on the human lineage.

Introduction to Systems and Computational Neuroscience: Tactile Perception

This course focuses on the basic principles of organization of the sensory pathways and their target regions of cerebral cortex.

Introduction to Systems and Computational Neuroscience: Visual Perception

The course focuses on the structure and functions of the mammalian visual systems, with a special emphasis on shape processing and object recognition.

Language, Reading and the Brain

This course offers an introduction to how the brain deals with language and reading by focusing on the relationship between form and meaning, notably described by linguistic morphology.

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